10 Things to Consider Before Bringing a New Pet Home | petMD

41 Things You Should Know Before Getting A Dog - BuzzFeed
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Like most people, you’ve probably heard time and again that if you have kids, you should adopt a Collie puppy (or, gasp! find a Collie puppy for sale). The rationale is that an adult shelter dog is an unknown quantity, so buying or adopting a Collie puppy is safer. Actually, the opposite is closer to the truth. Puppies are not usually a great choice with kids; they have very limited control over their biting/mouthing impulses, and when you mix that with lots of energy and unbelievably sharp little teeth, it’s a recipe for your small fry to be in tears. Puppies are tiny chewing machines and can destroy a favorite stuffed animal or security blanket in short order. Adult dogs, on the other hand, are generally calmer, and their personalities are already fully developed and on display. When you meet an adult dog, you can see how they are with kids and with other animals. This takes the guesswork out of wondering how a puppy will turn out as a full-grown dog.
What to look for when buying a puppy. What to look for when buying a Family Protection Dog. What to look for when buying a guard dog.
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Like most people, you’ve probably heard time and again that if you have kids, you should adopt a Siberian Husky puppy (or, gasp! find a Siberian Husky puppy for sale). The rationale is that an adult shelter dog is an unknown quantity, so buying or adopting a Siberian Husky puppy is safer. Actually, the opposite is closer to the truth. Puppies are not usually a great choice with kids; they have very limited control over their biting/mouthing impulses, and when you mix that with lots of energy and unbelievably sharp little teeth, it’s a recipe for your small fry to be in tears. Puppies are tiny chewing machines and can destroy a favorite stuffed animal or security blanket in short order. Adult dogs, on the other hand, are generally calmer, and their personalities are already fully developed and on display. When you meet an adult dog, you can see how they are with kids and with other animals. This takes the guesswork out of wondering how a puppy will turn out as a full-grown dog. Feb 17, 2012 - As much as dog lovers melt over a cute, cuddly puppy, when it comes time to actually buy a dog, price sensitivity enters into it
Photo provided by Pexels10 Things You Absolutely Must Know Before Getting A Puppy - Bustle
Photo provided by FlickrMar 7, 2014 - Pretty much anyone with a dog will gush to you about how awesome he is
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Owning a first-aid kit for your pup is a great idea to keep in your home, or with you and your dog at all times when traveling, hiking, etc. in case anything happens. You can buy a dog first-aid kit, or make your own including these essentials.Don't be fooled: Internet puppy scammers attract potential buyers with cute photos and phony promises. Hundreds of complaints are filed every year from victims who were scammed when buying a dog online—the puppy you receive may not be the puppy you agreed to buy, or you may not receive a puppy at all. Internet scams range from fake "free to good home" ads where the buyer is asked to pay for shipping, only to never see that puppy they tried to help, to breeders posing as sanctuaries or rescues, but charging upwards of $1,000 in "adoption" fees. However, that experience convinced Glynn that it was time to buy pet insurance for all three of their dogs. When she checked into it, she discovered that approximately 10 companies now offer pet insurance in the United States.People who are in the business of buying and selling dogs may have their own contracts, covering all the subjects they've found important over the years. If you're not in the dog business, the checklist below lists areas to think about when drawing up an agreement.As sad as it is, your dog will die and you'll probably be the one to decide when that will be. You'll also probably be there during the final moments. I've had nightmares about this myself. I prefer the terminology of "adopting a dog" to "buying a dog" because this is more about family and love than it is about a possession. This is a lifetime—your dog's life—commitment and I know I didn't fully grasp what that meant until I had a dog of my own.Are you killing a shelter dog when you buy a pet from a breeder? Not in your case: The alternative for you would be to not get a dog at all. Among the 50 or 60 million dog-owning American households, there are other people who share your preferences. And so a role remains for a responsible breeder. But as a dog lover who worries about abandoned animals, you probably should contribute to organizations that may reduce their numbers. Don’t think of this as the canine equivalent of a carbon-offset program. The reason to contribute is not that doing business with a breeder automatically makes you culpable but that it’s a way to support a cause about which you care deeply.