Leerburg Dog Training | How to Fit a Prong Collar

As with most dog training tools, there are both the good and bad sides to the prong collar.
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I've been using the Leerburg DD Collar as a back-up for my prong collars for many years -- Started this with my 100 pound Akita bitch, but she was too big, Heavy and STRONG for me to use the DD as a Dog-Aggression deterrent ... However now that my Akita has passed away, I have tried the DD collar to DRAIN DRIVE out of my new "leash-reactive" adopted rescue Doberman bitch, who is much smaller, more Light Weight and LESS powerful than my previous dog was, and it WORKS just Exactly as advertised !!! The first few times training my Dobie to LEAVE IT while in "dog threatening mode" I pulled straight up on the DD collar enough to raise her front paws off the ground (never so long that she lost consciousness, but just enough to take her air away & drain her drive down to nothing) and then after 2-3 sessions, all she needs now is Firm UPWARD Pressure on the DD to lose all interest in menacing other dogs


As with most dog training tools, there are both the good and bad sides to the prong collar.
Photo provided by Flickr
it is extremely hard to train a dog on a harness, harness is designed for dogs to pull, it actually encourages pulling…absolutely move to a prong collar, they are safe, they empower you to communicate with your dog, I have free videos to fully train you and your dog on how to train your dog.
jeff 3) training your dog in a positive fashion and using a prong collar are hardly mutually exclusive.
Photo provided by FlickrWhat About Prong And Chain Collars? – Phoenix Scottsdale AZ Dog Training – Dog Trainer – Behaviorist
Photo provided by FlickrThis video shows the introduction to using a prong collar with my Coversational Leash Work™ Dog Training technique.
Photo provided by Flickr
Of all the tools used in dog training, perhaps none is more widely misunderstood and maligned than the prong collar (also known as the pinch collar). Many well-meaning but misinformed people assume that judging by its looks, the prong collar is a barbaric device intended to "stab" a dog's neck in order to correct misbehavior. While walking my own dogs on this type of collar I have encountered complete strangers who think nothing of telling me how cruel I am to use such a harsh device. While I am indifferent to this type of comment, I worry that similar incidents will drive responsible dog owners away from using this excellent, effective and kind (yes, kind) training tool on dogs that benefit from it the most. This article is meant to reassure those who are already using the collar or are considering it and more importantly, to educate those who think it is "cruel" or unfair to the dog. The prong collar works on the concept that evenly applied pressure is gentler and more effective on a dog's neck than the quick jerk and impact of a choke chain or the steady, relentless pressure of a flat collar. While a professional trainer can make a choke chain correction look fast and flawless, it is very difficult for most pet dog owners to master the timing and the release of the correction. Also, even a perfectly executed choke chain correction is a repeated impact on a single spot on a dog's neck. The current trend of the "head halter" system is equally flawed. In an earlier edition of this article, I referred to it as a good choice for dogs with structural problems. In the past few years I have spoken with veterinarians, trainers and owners who took issue with that recommendation based on the potential insult to the soft tissue of the dog's upper neck and the often careless way in which the headcollar is used by people who are assured that it is "humane" and cannot harm their dog. Like every other training tool, it also has its place. However, for a breed already beset with potential spinal and structural problems such as the Doberman, I find myself recommending it less and less. The self-limiting tightening action of the prong collar also makes it a safer bet for strong-pulling dogs. A prong collar can only be pulled so tight, unlike the choke or slip collar, which has unlimited closing capacity and in careless or abusive hands, can cut a dog's air entirely.