Should You Buy Your Dog from a Shelter or a Pet Store? - TheStreet

When you buy a dog from a pet store, you're supporting cruel puppy mills
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Every new dog owner wants to know which Singapore pet shop to buy affordable pet supplies from. So in 2014, I scoured the web to compile a directory of Singapore’s Online Pet Shops and ended up with a list of 50 online stores. 50! You can .
Let me start with some reasons why buying a puppy or adult dog, or kitten or adult cat from a pet store is absolutely not a good idea:
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Yes – I agree about choice…YES. However, consider that many – even most – of the dogs available at pet stores are from puppy mills. Sadly, we’re not doing a very good job of closing them down at one end…so maybe we can if people don’t buy them…supply & demand. (and usually for a lot less money than buying a dog from a breeder or a pet store).
Photo provided by Flickr[Vent] BUYING dogs at a pet store is NOT adopting! : dogs - Reddit
Photo provided by FlickrFavorite pet store to buy food and treats for my dog!
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With every dollar spent on a pet store puppy, a mill is driven to produce another litter of dogs in deplorable conditions. Buying a dog is a huge commitment and shouldn’t ever be done on impulse. As much as you want to “rescue” that doggie in the window, it only continues the vicious cycle of the puppy mill industry. Any dog of any age can end up in a shelter. Someone may breed their purebred dog to sell the puppies but then not find homes for all the purebred puppies. Or someone might buy a puppy from a breeder or a pet store, and then be unable to keep the puppy. Perhaps they cannot afford the care, or there is a crisis in the family that requires them to find a new home for their dog. They may not be able to return the puppy to the dog breeder or pet store, and so the purebred puppy might be taken to a shelter to find a new home.Where to buy a dogSome people want to get a purebred puppy and think their only option is to go to a local pet store or dog breeder near them. That's certainly one way to get a purebred dog or puppy, but many people don’t realize that sometimes purebred dogs and puppies end up in shelters and need homes as well.Any dog of any age can end up in a shelter. Someone may breed their purebred dog to sell the puppies but then not find homes for all the purebred puppies. Or someone might buy a puppy from a breeder or a pet store, and then be unable to keep the puppy. Perhaps they cannot afford the care, or there is a crisis in the family that requires them to find a new home for their dog. They may not be able to return the puppy to the dog breeder or pet store, and so the purebred puppy might be taken to a shelter to find a new home.Adopting vs BuyingWhen people want to buy a dog or buy a puppy from a breeder or pet store, more and more people are first searching their local animal shelter or purebred rescue group to see if there might be a purebred dog or puppy they might like to adopt. In most cases this is a cheaper way to buy a puppy. Adopting a pet from a shelter or rescue also saves a life, so if you are looking to find a breeder or visit a pet store, please consider as an option adopting a dog from your animal shelter or rescue organization near you. Lots of pet stores say that they buy their dogs from responsible breeders. But according to the the organization behind this week's Puppy Mills Action Week, the word "breeder" can apply to anyone who puts two dogs together. In addition, an actual responsible breeder usually doesn't want to sell her dogs to a pet store -- they'd prefer to sell them in person to a buyer. Even if a breeder is USDA or government inspected, he can still legally house dozens or even hundreds of breeding dogs in small wire cages for their entire lives. When people want to buy a dog or buy a puppy from a breeder or pet store, more and more people are first searching their local animal shelter or purebred rescue group to see if there might be a purebred dog or puppy they might like to adopt. In most cases this is a cheaper way to buy a puppy. Adopting a pet from a shelter or rescue also saves a life, so if you are looking to find a breeder or visit a pet store, please consider as an option adopting a dog from your animal shelter or rescue organization near you.Today we have Labrador Retrievers with legs that belong on Great Danes; American Eskimos that look like Samoyeds with snipy heads; light-boned Akitas; Shetland Sheepdogs as big as Collies; Dalmatians and Airedales with screwy personalities; aggressive Old English Sheepdogs; neurotic Poodles; unsocialized Chow Chows; and dysplastic dogs of all breeds sold in pet stores. The buyer cannot visit the facility that produced the puppies and talk to the breeder; ask about genetic clearances, parent-dog temperaments, or breed characteristics; see the quality of adult dogs produced by the kennel; be reimbursed if the dog develops a genetic disease two or three years down the road; get help with training or behavior problems; ask for local references to contact about previous puppy sales; be assured that someone feels responsible for bringing that particular puppy into the world and will take it back if the family falls on hard times.