Today, the recommended flea and tick treatments for dogs include:

 to discuss flea and tick treatment options for dogs with a veterinarian.
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Another method of topical medication, tick powders work to kill and repel ticks from your dog. Be sure that the powder you are using is labeled for dogs before use, as well as for your dog’s specific age. This very fine powder can be an irritant to the mouth or lungs if inhaled so use small amounts and slowly rub it into the skin. Keep powders away from the face and eyes when applying. You will need to reapply the product more often, about once a week during peak season.
to discuss flea and tick treatment options for dogs with a veterinarian.
Photo provided by Flickr
After a romp outside in areas where ticks could be lurking, be sure to carefully check your dog for ticks. Look between the toes, inside the ears, between the legs (in the "armpits"), and around the neck, deep in the fur. If you find any ticks before they have had a chance to attach and become engorged, you may have prevented serious illness for your dog. If you do find a tick attached to your dog, removal should be done immediately and carefully, making sure to get all parts of the tick’s body removed from the skin. to discuss flea and tick treatment options for dogs with a veterinarian.
Photo provided by Flickrto discuss flea and tick treatment options for dogs with a veterinarian.
Photo provided by FlickrWebMD veterinary experts answer commonly asked questions about fleas and ticks on your dog.
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Use the tool below to generate a map of your home area to see the number of reported positive cases of , , and heartworm disease in dogs. Maps are available for all regions of the United States and Canada. Because so many dogs go untested for tick-borne diseases, the actual number of dogs infected by ticks is likely many times higher than reported figures.Generally known as vector-borne disease, the risks they pose to your dog can be minimized with (topical medications, tick collars, etc.) and include vector-borne disease screening. This is especially important, as symptoms of vector-borne disease are often vague and difficult to recognize. Because of this, many pet owners don’t know their dog is suffering from a debilitating tick disease until it’s too late.Ticks are common parasites that can be found anywhere, from the deep woods to urban parks. And each year, thousands of dogs become infected with serious diseases transmitted by a number of different . Diseases like , , .In addition to , ticks also carry , , and others. There’s simply no way for pet owners to tell if a tick is carrying disease or not, and it only takes one tick bite to infect your dog. Also, some ticks are known to carry more than one of these diseases, which can lead to multiple infections, or coinfection. What’s common among all vector-borne disease, however, is that symptoms can be vague and difficult to recognize. Often many pet owners don’t know their dog is suffering from a debilitating tick disease until it’s too late.One of the first things you can do to protect your dog is to learn about the . This way you’ll better understand the risks your dog is likely to encounter in his or her daily adventures. At the same time, make an appointment with your veterinarian to talk about , including topical medication, tick collars and vaccines for .Check your dog for ticks every day, especially during tick season: spring, summer and fall, or year-round in warmer climates. Brush your fingers through their fur applying enough pressure to feel any small bumps. Be sure to check between your dog’s toes, behind ears, under armpits and around the tail and head, too. If you do feel a bump, pull the fur apart to see what’s there. A tick that has embedded itself in your dog will vary in size, something from the size of a pinhead to a grape depending on how long its been attached. Ticks are usually black or dark brown in color but will turn a grayish-white after feeding in what’s referred to as an engorged state.