Vibration Collars for Deaf Dogs – Deaf Dogs Rock

• Buy a tag for your dog’s collar that says: “Sparky is deaf. If found, please call …”
Photo provided by Flickr
There are many companies out there that will personalize a leash and collar. By adding “I’m Deaf” to your dog’s leash and collar, you are making it even more clear to the world that your dog can’t hear and may need extra help.
Angi Holt-Parks' dog Rudi wears a special collar tag alerting others that she is deaf.
Photo provided by Flickr
All DogWatch systems feature a warning signal, which alerts your dog that he is approaching the boundary. Our standard collars use an audible alert. While this option works for most pets, it is not the best option for pets who are deaf. That’s why we created a Vibration Receiver Collar. A deaf dog can quickly learn to stop at the warning signal before he reaches the hidden wire, just like his hearing counterparts. Angi Holt-Parks' dog Rudi wears a special collar tag alerting others that she is deaf.
Photo provided by FlickrLet other people know your dog is deaf with this clear, bright pink collar.
Photo provided by PexelsNote: 'Jake' has since passed and so 'Rusty' has volunteered to model the Deaf Dog Caller Collar. He says,
Photo provided by Flickr
A collection of websites with additional deaf dog information, including E-mail lists, websites on canine deafness, ASL sites, and links to deaf dog picnic pages. and webrings have their own page.All dogs need training - they just need to learn what each sound or gesture means. No one would assume that just because a dog can hear that he will come running back to you if you call him. You need to train the dog to respond to your voice commands. The same applies to a deaf dog. You have to teach him to respond to your commands. The biggest difference between a hearing dog and a deaf one is that you can't use your voice to get the dog's attention. If he is across the room or across the field and doesn't look at you, you can't yell to him, direct him, or summon him back to you. If your deaf dog gets loose, it can be a terrifying experience - will he look at me? If he doesn't look at you, you can't communicate. These types of experiences, and the wish to be able to better communicate with deaf dogs, has lead to the development and use of the vibrating collar.All DogWatch systems feature a warning signal, which alerts your dog that he is approaching the boundary. Our standard collars use an audible alert. While this option works for most pets, it is not the best option for pets who are hard-of-hearing or deaf. That’s why we created a Vibration Receiver Collar. The collar’s vibration warning is perfect for older and/or hearing-impaired dogs. Your pet can quickly learn to stop at the warning signal before he reaches the hidden wire, just like his hearing counterparts.The vibration signal for a deaf dog becomes the equivalent of using voice to get the attention of your hearing dog. Many people just assume that since their dog can hear them, it will obey them when off-leash, which is not the case. Every dog is trained and obeys at a different level. This is true of a deaf dog using a vibrating collar also. Every dog must be treated and seen as an individual and you must take that into account. Each dog will be different and it will depend on your dog - and your comfort level - if your dog can ever be let off-leash, even using a vibrating collar.Long before the invention of vibration based systems I had to dealwith the issues of training a deaf dog with a remote collar. It hasbeen my experience that some hunting dogs tend to have substantialhearing loss as they reach "old age."Please note that a vibrating collar is not needed to train a deaf dog. It is a training tool, not a magical device that will cause your dog to respond to every signal you give him or her. It will not help your dog to learn anything you want to teach him. It simply gives you a way to get your dog's attention when they are not looking at you. Many deaf dogs have been successfully and completely trained without one.