Burying dog poop near fruiting trees/bushes? - GardenWeb

Jun 10, 2016 - It's pretty typical to see a cat bury their poop, but why do dogs look like ..
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The other alternative aside from burying it in your garden or dumping dog poop into your bin is to consider installing a dog toilet, aka a doggy loo. These are buckets with holes in the bottom you place into the ground on a bed of stones and then add an enzyme to which will break down the poop. When the bucket is full, you simply pour water into it and the broken down materials will flush away. There’s no risk to your plants, so you can have the bucket hidden away in your garden.
Well, if you have to put dog poop around your fruit trees, bury it under a thick mulch so if someone step on it, it won't spread around.
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Another idea for dog poop: Flush it. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends flushing as the optimal solution, one that the Los Angeles Department of Sanitation supports. If you have a yard, you can bury your pet waste in a hole at least a foot deep, below the runoff zone. Just keep it out of your vegetable garden (yes, those diseases again). You can also compost it with proper equipment, like the Doggie Dooley, which works like a septic system to break down feces with enzymes and bacteria. Dogs bury bones, cats bury poop. Hiding waste is a  , but it's not just because cats are obsessed with cleanliness.
Photo provided by FlickrCan dog poop put nutrients in the soil if you bury it? - Quora
Photo provided by FlickrThe age old question: to bury or scoop dog poop? - Fin and Field Blog
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A dog waste compost system that you just bury in the corner, and scoop the poop into it. It breaks it down and eliminates it with enzymes. For my dog loving, and yard loving friends. @Michelle Flynn Snow @Audra Harris Sergel @Laura Jayson Davis @Ron Haydon MartinEven if you could persuade folks to carry a trowel hefty enough to bury dog poop, you'd have no control over where it was interred. And with total U.S. dog waste estimated at more than 9 million tons a year, that's a lot of digging.ROL: For those who are totally grossed out by the idea of composting pet poop, what advice would you offer?
RS: There are ways to make it less icky. You can simply throw dog poo into a cool . No gross-out, all-eco brownie points! I should note that septic bins don’t work with raw cat waste, but you can use compostable litter and bury the waste in the ground (like a feral cat).Even if you could persuade folks to carry a trowel hefty enough to bury dog poop, you'd have no control over where it was interred. And with total U.S. dog waste estimated at more than 9 million tons a year, that's a lot of digging.As for burying the dog poop in the sand, I'm not sure that's the best move. I don't know for sure, but I imagine it would still be able to contaminate the water at some point.Even if you could persuade folks to carry a trowel hefty enough to bury dog poop, you'd have no control over where it was interred. And with total U.S. dog waste estimated at more than 9 million tons a year, that's a lot of digging.Even if you could persuade folks to carry a trowel hefty enough to bury dog poop, you'd have no control over where it was interred. And with total U.S. dog waste estimated at more than 9 million tons a year, that's a lot of digging.I am admittedly old-school on this: when I hike with dogs, I simply move their poops well off the trail, generally in a manner that leaves zero chance of it being discovered by another hiker before it disappears into the elements. Along these lines, I was talking to one of the Oegon Field Guide crew this spring, and he mentioned that the new, preferred method for disposing of human waste in backcountry areas is not to bury it, but rather, to "smear it" (his words) to speed up decomposition. Really? If so, then it sounds a lot like distributing dog poop, too... on less-travelled trails, at least.